The Minerva Project

The Minerva Project described in the Atlantic Monthly (August 13th, 2014) signals ways in which higher education is evolving, resulting mainly from developments in communications technology. Institutional structures will change with implications for students, teachers, administrative staff and governments. Minerva is an accredited university in San Francisco and will shortly open six campuses outside the US.

1. The Atlantic article argues that the model of higher education and probably education in general is being hit with a wrecking ball, as the magazine cover depicts.  How the parts will be reassembled and how students of all ages (I include myself but am more interested in those born after 2000) will be affected is a subject for study. Similar changes have occurred in numerous areas including book, newspaper and magazine publishing, film, television, music and video production and distribution, banking and finance and shopping. How often do you now go to your bank, write a cheque or use a broker to make stock transactions? Post secondary education is the next institutional arrangement to be reformed with implications for students, teachers, administrators and governments.

2. Online learning as provided by MOOCs is one model in contrast with in class learning. All current teaching combines some combination of in class and online learning. The latter has a long heritage with correspondence courses and the Open University in the UK (I am sure there were models in other jurisdictions with which I am unfamiliar). These suppliers solved the problems of invigilating, marking exams and creating credentials which employers recognized. A large number of people often register for MOOCs, but a small percentage take the tests which result in some kind of credential. I am one of those who register. I do so out of interest in a subject and it’s free. Others register in order to search the available options before deciding which ones to take. Persons over 30 are more likely to seek a credential, suggesting that online learning is being used as a method of continuing education.

3. What Minerva does is to combine online and in class education in a novel way which creates for-pay education, students selected entirely on the basis of academic ability from around the world – no entitlements for certain groups, awarding of credentials (which will have to prove their worth as is the case with any new brand), and a requirement that faculty teach and conduct seminars and discussion groups in a particular way, not just how they choose. None of us who were in this game before had much if any experience in lecturing and conducting seminars, other than what we had been subject to. We mostly winged it with student evaluations providing some feedback. Today, social media provides often ruthless comments on instructors.

4. Minerva charges a fee of 28k dollars annually with some financial aid provisions. This is about half an Ivy League fee. If fees are considered an annual consumption expenditure then they are high, but if treated as an investment and a capital expenditure then they are similar to taking a mortgage to invest in home ownership or a loan to buy a car. The value of the educational investment will only be known in the future as will the ownership of a house and car. The latter depreciates with time and will become worth less unless it becomes valued as an antique. None of the cars I ever owned fell into the antique category. An education will also depreciate with time and is why the process of continuing education exists either within a firm or by taking external courses. Firms offer training seminars for their employees, while academics are expected to keep abreast of their discipline by reading and undertaking published research and presentations.

5. Would a Minerva type operation grant tenure, a form of long term contract which the institution but not the instructor find it difficult to annul? Not as long as it can hire and retain suitable lecturers. If this is not possible, then it will offer long term contracts and other benefits to retain high quality staff. Note that without a contract a staff member can be fired at any time. And if lecturers with long term contracts wants to leave early, it is probably a good idea to let them go as they may not be delivering the best teaching services thereby reflecting adversely on the institution.

6. My guess is that the Minerva format will be followed by for profit competitors who will try different formats for the delivery of higher education. Change is already evident and only those administrations which experiment and adapt will survive. I am willing to bet $100 that change will be clearly visible within three years – we can negotiate on who should be the judge of the outcome.
Sent from my iPad

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